The Coronavirus application is ‘less invasive than google maps’ – ABOUT MAG 2020

The Coronavirus app is ‘less invasive than Google Maps’, says Gladys Berejiklian, when asking Australians to sign up despite privacy concerns

  • The federal government is launching a coronavius ​​contact tracking application
  • Concerns have been raised, the app can be used by the police to spy on people
  • The government said it will act to ban the police from accessing their data
  • Gladys Berejiklian said today that the app is ‘less invasive’ than google maps
  • See how to help people affected by Covid-19

The federal government’s next coronavius ​​contact tracking app is “less invasive than Google Maps,” New South Wales Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian said today.

The app, which will launch next week, will record the Bluetooth connections that a phone makes with other people to identify someone’s contacts if they get the virus.

Concerns have been raised, the app can be used to spy on people, prompting the government to ban the police from accessing their data.

New South Wales Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian (pictured) asked all residents with coronavirus symptoms to be tested

New South Wales Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian (pictured) asked all residents with coronavirus symptoms to be tested

But Berejiklian has eased those concerns, saying the app does not track people’s location.

“The most specific thing you should put in is your post code,” she told KIIS radio.

– I took a look and it is not so invasive. It is much less invasive than buying something over the Internet or accessing Google Maps.

Google Maps has an optional setting that can track users’ movements using the phone’s GPS signal.

Premier added: “People are concerned about privacy, but when it is life or death, you kind of give up privacy a little.”

Prime Minister Scott Morrison confirmed on Thursday that the Commonwealth government will not have access to the data.

Users of the TraceTogether application (photo), which is now being developed in Australia, use Bluetooth technology to track people

Users need to give the app full permissions, but can disable it at any time

Users of the TraceTogether application (photo), which is now being developed in Australia, use Bluetooth technology to track people

How will the contact tracking application work?

The application will record the Bluetooth connections that a phone makes with other people.

If some catch the virus, they can consent to provide this data to state health officials.

Employees can then inform their contacts.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison confirmed on Thursday that the Commonwealth government will not have access to the data.

He said: ‘The information collected from this application goes to a fully encrypted national data store and the Commonwealth government does not have access to the information in that data store. None. Zero. Zip closure. Anything.’

Earlier this week, government services minister Stuart Robert said the app will not collect data about a person’s location.

He said: ‘All he will tell me is that you and I were, for 15 minutes or more, 1.5 meters away from each other.

– It will not tell us where, because it is irrelevant or what you are doing. We don’t care where you are or what you are doing.

He said: ‘The information collected from this application goes to a fully encrypted national data store and the Commonwealth government does not have access to the information in that data store. None. Zero. Zip closure. Anything.’

Earlier this week, government services minister Stuart Robert said the app will not collect data about a person’s location.

He said: ‘All he will tell me is that you and I were, for 15 minutes or more, 1.5 meters away from each other.

– It will not tell us where, because it is irrelevant or what you are doing. We don’t care where you are or what you are doing.

Robert explained that the data would remain on someone’s phone and would only be sent to health officials if it was positive for the coronavirus.

The app, which will launch next week, will record the Bluetooth connections that a phone makes with other people to identify someone's contacts if they get the virus. Photo: Mock-up photo

The app, which will launch next week, will record the Bluetooth connections that a phone makes with other people to identify someone’s contacts if they get the virus. Photo: Mock-up photo

Paula Fonseca