Ibuprofen may be used as ‘bone-safe’ analgesic treatment after Colles’ fracture – About Your Online Magazine


Disclosures:
Aliuskevicius reports that he received donations from the Spar Nord Foundation, Obel Family Foundation and Aase and Einar Danielsens Foundation. Please refer to the study for the relevant financial disclosures from all other authors.


For patients with Colles’ fractures treated non-surgically, ibuprofen reduced pain without causing changes in fragment migration or functional, densitometric and biochemical results, according to published results.

In a single-center, triple-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial, Marius Aliuskevicius, MD, and colleagues assigned 96 patients with Colles’ fractures treated non-surgically to one of the following three cohorts: a 3-day ibuprofen group, a 7-day ibuprofen group and a control group. According to the study, the 3-day group received 600 mg of ibuprofen three times a day for the first 3 days and a placebo for the next 4 days, the 7-day group received 600 mg of ibuprofen three times a day for 7 days. and the control group received placebo tablets three times a day for 7 days. Outcome measures included migration of the radiological fragment for 5 weeks, range of motion, DASH score, bone mineral density of the injured wrist, changes in serum and osteocalcin and analgesic effects.

Overall, pain scores in the first 3 days were lower in the ibuprofen groups than in the placebo group. In addition, the researchers found no “significant differences” in radiological migration or in functional, densitometric and biochemical effects between the ibuprofen groups.

“Treatment with ibuprofen did not affect the healing of Colles’ fracture. The addition of ibuprofen to the analgesic treatment provided better pain relief in the acute phase of the fracture ”, wrote the researchers in the study. “These findings may offer an indication for ibuprofen as a safe pain reliever for bones and can be translated into other areas of orthopedics for the treatment of spongy bone fractures,” they wrote.

Paula Fonseca