UNICEF chief asks G7 to donate excess vaccines to cover COVAX shortfall – About Your Online Magazine




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People line up to enter a vaccination clinic at the International Center in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, on May 13, 2021. (Photo by Zou Zheng / Xinhua)

Sharing the excess doses immediately available is a minimal, essential and emergency palliative measure, and is needed now, said UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore.

UNITED NATIONS, May 17 (Xinhua) – Executive director of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), Henrietta Fore, on Sunday asked the Group of Seven (G7) industrialized countries to donate surplus COVID-19 vaccines to the COVAX Facility, a global tool for purchasing and delivering vaccines to low and middle income countries.

She made the call while G7 leaders will meet next month in Britain.

A new analysis of data provided by Airfinity, a life sciences research facility, indicates that G7 nations and the “Team Europe” group of European Union member states could donate about 153 million doses of vaccines if they shared only 20 percent of its supply available in June, July and August. They could do this while still fulfilling their commitments to vaccinate their own populations, Fore said in a statement.



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A woman receives a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination center in New Delhi, India, on May 15, 2021. (Str / Xinhua)

“While some G7 members have greater supply than others, and some have moved further into the domestic market, an immediate collective commitment to pooling oversupply and sharing the burden of responsibility can help vulnerable countries become the next point global hot spot, “she said. .

Sharing the excess doses immediately available is a minimal, essential and emergency palliative measure, and is needed now, she said.

Among the global consequences of the situation in India, a global center for vaccine production, is a severe reduction in vaccines available for COVAX. Its growing domestic demand means that 140 million doses destined for distribution to low and middle income countries by the end of May cannot be accessed by COVAX. Another 50 million doses are likely to be missed in June, the statement said.

The clearest way out of this pandemic is a global and equitable distribution of vaccines, diagnostics and therapies. COVAX, with UNICEF as the main implementing partner, represents that path, she said.

Paula Fonseca