Boris Johnson pledges to donate 100m vaccine doses to countries in need over the next year  – About Your Online Magazine


Britain will give 100 million doses of Covid to the rest of the world: Boris Johnson promises to donate a large number of vaccine doses to countries in need next year

  • Boris Johnson will use the summit to push plans to vaccinate the world
  • Britain will donate 100 million vaccines to countries in need next year
  • The UK will start donating vaccines within weeks, providing 5 million by the end of September
  • Another 25 million jabs will be distributed by the end of the year to countries in need

Britain will donate 100 million doses of vaccines to countries in need next year, Boris Johnson said last night.

In a grand international gesture, the prime minister will use the summit to push forward plans to vaccinate the world by the end of 2022.

Under its plans, the UK will start donating vaccines within weeks, providing five million doses to countries in need by the end of September.

About 25 million jabs will be distributed by the end of the year and the rest will follow in 2022.

Eighty percent of the 100 million doses will go to the Covax initiative, which is distributing vaccines to the poorest nations. The rest will be shared bilaterally with countries in need.

The grant – estimated at around £1 billion – will come as an extra expense on top of the £10 billion committed to the new foreign aid target of 0.5 per cent of gross domestic product.

Britain will donate 100 million doses of vaccines to countries in need next year, Boris Johnson said last night.

Britain will donate 100 million doses of vaccines to countries in need next year, Boris Johnson said last night.

Last night, the Prime Minister said: ‘Since the beginning of this pandemic, the UK has been leading efforts to protect humanity against this deadly disease.

‘Over a year ago, we funded the development of the Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine on the basis that it would be distributed at cost to the world. This unprecedented model, which places people directly above profits, means that more than half a billion doses have been administered in 160 countries so far. ‘

He added: ‘As a result of the success of the UK vaccine programme, we are now in a position to share some of our excess doses with those who need them.

“By doing this, we will take a big step towards winning this pandemic forever.”

Mr Johnson said he hoped other G7 leaders would make similar promises so that “together, we can vaccinate the world by the end of next year and rebuild better with coronavirus.”

By sharing vaccines in the coming weeks, the UK will meet immediate demand from the countries most affected by the pandemic, said number 10. However, this is not expected to delay completion of the domestic launch – with every adult in the UK likely receiving a first dose of vaccine by the end of July.

Officials hope that vaccinating people around the world will save lives, reduce the spread of the virus and curb the emergence of new strains that could be more dangerous than existing strains of coronaviruses.

According to its plans, the UK will start donating vaccines within weeks, providing five million doses to needy countries by the end of September, with 25 million doses donated by the end of the year (photo: a student receives a dose of the Pfizer vaccine at a vaccination center in London)

According to its plans, the UK will start donating vaccines within weeks, providing five million doses to needy countries by the end of September, with 25 million doses donated by the end of the year (photo: a student receives a dose of the Pfizer vaccine at a vaccination center in London)

And that comes after the UK re-committed to spending 0.7 percent of national income on foreign aid.

The new target, which was reduced to 0.5 percent, was achieved as the government struggles to fill the black hole in the country’s finances. But the vaccine donation will count as extra aid spending, on top of the £10bn already pledged under the reduced target.

Baroness Liz Sugg, who stepped down as foreign minister in protest at the cuts, said the vaccine pledge was a “very welcome first step.”

But she added: “Low-income countries will need many more vaccines this year to help end the pandemic and prevent the development of variants that could threaten progress against the pandemic here in the UK.”

She continued: “It is crucial that the government cover the real cost of these vaccines and not just shift their excess orders to low-income countries.”

In total, global leaders are expected to pledge at least one billion doses of vaccines to the world and expand manufacturing to meet the goal. Joe Biden has already pledged to donate half a billion vaccines from Pfizer.

Mr Johnson should also ask world leaders to encourage pharmaceutical giants to adopt the Oxford / AstraZeneca model of providing jabs at cost.

Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson have already pledged to share 1.3 billion doses with nonprofit low- and middle-income countries.

Paula Fonseca